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You could try to do it yourself, but just how do you pick up over 40 balls with your hands?

I’d just finished a long and very productive training session with my Lobster Elite 2 (which I just love for how it mimics a human opponent with its varieties of play), but I couldn’t rest just yet. I still had to go around and pick up the tennis balls—my most dreaded chore. I picked them, painfully, for the last time that day. It is times like that I remember seeing something which could have been helpful. I remembered seeing the Tournas Pete Sampras Ballport as a bestseller on Amazon, and when I learned that it has rolling bottom bars to pick up tennis balls for you and keep them secure in its basket, I made the order.

Trust me; it has been a total game changer. I never thought that I would look forward to picking up tennis balls after my training, but I actually do now. Not only is it faster to use my ball hopper, I know I’m not putting a strain on my back anymore. With its rotating handles which lock up and down for easy dispensing, it is no wonder that its features are patented. Considering its 80-ball capacity, I didn’t find it heavy at 5.3 lbs. It is very easy to assemble, cheap, and rust-resistant. It is made of high quality polypropylene, which means it looks really stylish and you can recycle it. I can’t do without it now, and I’m sure you’d love it just the same way.

Gamma has a great alternative in the Tennis Hopper Hi-Rise. It features a specially reinforced design that is weather-resistant so it is definitely made to last. Its wear bumpers provide even more durability. It can hold up to 75 balls, and with the carrying handles, you can easily move it around the court. Its lid tightly secures the balls and prevents them from spilling, so the balls can be safe even if it’s a youngster carrying it for you.  

If you prefer something that can hold more balls, a great choice is the Hoparrazi, with its built-in wheels and adjustable handle height that converts to sturdy lock-in legs; it holds up to 125 balls and has a snap-shut lid. This makes sure that the balls are kept in place for easy storage. With the wheels for easy transportation, you are definitely getting sweet bang for your buck at 60USD.

Now you really aren’t considering playing tennis without tennis balls, are you? I didn’t think so. I’ve always used the Penn Championship tennis balls for practice with people. As the Official Ball for USTA Leagues, they are pretty much the standard for other tennis balls. They have controlled fiber release for consistent nap, natural rubber for consistent feel and reduced shock, and interlocked wool fiber that ensures they last you longer. You can be rest assured that you are getting quality play each time you use them.

Even though they are the best balls for competitions, I don’t use or recommend using the Penn Championship balls for rebound practice with a ball machine. When I use my Lobster Elite, I use the Penn pressureless balls. Pressureless balls are best for rebound practice because they don’t lose their bounce over time as regular balls are bound to. It’s almost like playing with new tennis balls indefinitely.

If your child always gets sulky after tennis training sessions, they might just be discouraged because standard balls are too fast for them to hit. A great tip would be to get the orange dot balls from Gamma for your children aged 10 and below, or the Gamma green dot balls for juniors aged 12 and above. The orange dot balls are 50 percent slower than standard tennis balls; and the green dot balls are 25 percent slower than standard tennis balls. The speed and the dots on the balls will help them spot the balls in time to hit. Thank me when you notice a pickup in their mood and play. 

I get my tennis loot from the Lobster website and they stock all the equipments I mentioned above at prices cheaper than Walmart and Amazon. You also get completely free shipping if your total order is over 100 USD, so hurry on to the Lobster website before they’re sold out!


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